Monday, 26 November 2018

"You've got-to want-to change..."

Modern people can't change because they spend all their time semi-conscious and externally driven; plugged-into and addicted-to the mass-social media, intoxicated, being-manipulated...

In one sense people need to break out of this before anything more can be achieved; rather as an alcoholic must first stop drinking, before he can even begin to fix his life.

But do they want to? - that is the question. There is a lot to suggest that most people don't want to change - and therefore they will not change. They may not be happy with what they are and what they do; but ultimately they want things to stay the same; only also made better - like an alcoholic whose deepest desire is easy access to limitless high-quality booze.

Some version of that (perhaps sex, drugs, admiration or money rather than booze?) is, apparently, what most modern people want from life.

If people want change, want God, want a Romantic life of spiritual connection - it is remarkable what can be achieved in despite of the most unpropitious circumstances; but when they don't want anything more than a more pleasurable version of what they already have, then none of it will happen - regardless of the external situation.

We live in a world of inverted-Good imposed from the Establishment and propagated via the media and all official institutions; but do the mass of people really object?

Not so far as I can see. They go along with it quite placidly, and are a lot more worried about the (imaginary) threat of people (extremists, fundamentalists, conspiracy theorists) rocking the boat.

They face a dire prospect is they look (not far) ahead - but when acknowledged this impending doom mostly intensifies their desire to wring as much pleasure as possible out of the next few hours.

Christians in general and Romantic Christians in particular might expend all their efforts in trying to change people who don't want to change - and it will be a completely ineffectual waste of effort. If, on the other hand, we respond as best and fast as we can to those who want to change - we may do good.

Yet there is an army of fake-askers - of 'trolls' who pretend to want to change, but are actually intending to waste our time. So, as always, discernment is required.

Fortunately, we have been equipped with a highly sensitive discerning ability, that works very well in face to face circumstances - if we let it: if we notice and listen-to what it is telling us (and don't try to argue with it by 'reasoning' and asking for 'evidence'!). This will - highly accurately - tell us who wants change versus who has some other agenda.

Discernment doesn't work so well online or in detachment or at second- or third-hand; there we are more easily fooled, and more likely to miss the subtle cues of a genuine desire for change.

At bottom, those who want to change must take responsibility for themselves changing; as the first and essential step. But we might be able to help - if that help is timely, specific and directed.

Clunky programmes, protocols, generic advice... are all counterproductive because adding delay, reducing specificity, and impairing the work of intuition.

Try to be ready; and when discernment say Yes, and intuition tells us What: act Now.