Friday, 7 December 2018

Who is the best blogger?

Blogs are clearly on the way out, and many of the best bloggers have gone - but let's just express our opinion on who is - overall - the best blogger...

Leaving-out myself (!) and also my co-bloggers at Albion Awakening and Junior Ganymede (because we are really the best :) - then who do you think is the best?

My vote goes to Vox Day (Theodore Beale) - whose blog is quite remarkable in terms of posting very frequently, across a wide range, and with great 'originality' - in the sense that he is so inventive and so good at discovering, elaborating and refining ideas.

I can understand it when people don't like his pugnacious style, but that also has its compensations - and is anyway far outweighed by his (rare!) bedrock virtues of honesty and solid, evangelical Christianity.

It should-not need to be said (now, or ever) that this endorsement does not imply that I agree with Vox on everything, or even on most things - because I don't agree with anybody in the world on everything (I am in a minority of one); but I do agree with him on the important issues, and that is what matters; and that is why I read Vox Popoli more often than any other blog.

But the question is - what is Your favourite blog, and why?

17 comments:

Nilrik Bosson said...

https://blogs.ancientfaith.com/glory2godforallthings/

It is profound,understandable and accurate.

ted said...

Robert Godwin's (aka Gagdad Bob) blog has had the most influence on me, and lines up with my disposition towards God!

Coincidentally, he is a hiatus at the moment.

Wm Jas Tychonievich said...

In the past: Jorn Barger, Denis Dutton, Eliezer Yudkowsky, Mencius Moldbug, Lawrence Auster. Now: I have nothing to say, since you and "G" are the only bloggers I read regularly.

Adamoriens said...

I'm with you on Vox Day. I also read Anonymous Conservative's news feed posts for news about the hidden side of the System, but they can be a bit depressing.

Ugh said...

I'd like Vox Day if I could just force myself to stay off the comment section. Talk about fan-boys. Vox himself is quite interesting and constrained just enough not to fall into know-it-all obnoxiousness.

I generally bounce around when it comes to bloggers/vloggers. The political stuff begins to grate on me and I have to try to find something intellectually stimulating. However, even those somehow devolve into politics.

Of course BC Notions does a nice job of mixing it up!

Francis Berger said...

I used to follow about ten blogs regularly, but over the past year or so I have whittled this down to two: you and Vox Day.

For me, Vox has been somewhat of an acquired taste. I had reservations about his blog when I first encountered it, but I now appreciate his style, content, and approach.

Owen said...

Agree. Kakistoctacy and chateau heartiste are also quite good.

eclecticme said...


I agree with you on Vox Day. He is arrogant and very full of himself which puts some people off. Even if I do not agree with him he makes me think very hard. NN Taleb does not really blog but he is awesome.

Manhattan Contrarian blogs every few days on limited topics, not releated to culture or religion. He writes concise, quantitative pieces on renewable energy, global warming, and public finance. The Duran creates some detailed pieces on Europe.

https://www.manhattancontrarian.com/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdeMVChrumySxV9N1w0Au-w

Hari Seldon said...

I agree that Vox Day is the best all-around blogger, present company excluded, for the reasons you cite.

I might add (although you didn't ask!) that I also read Anonymous Conservative on a fairly regular basis - he always links to shocking stories that I would not have otherwise seen, though his perspective is quite depressing and overly paranoid. I also visit Chateau Heartiste for humor and insight into America's cultural and social collapse.

Steve Sailer is another favorite but I feel the quality and energy of his blogging has declined in recent years - not sure why. He should have more than ever to write about in the Trump Era. Anatoly Karlin also runs a very interesting and informative blog about Russia, geopolitics and other issues.

In addition, I check the Unz Review frequently for updates from other authors including Pat Buchanan, John Derbyshire and Ron Unz himself. It's a valuable site if you can wade through the enormous quantities of unhinged Jew-bashing that pollute the front page.

Besides those, and a handful of specialty blogs I consult (focused on economics, foreign policy, etc), I get most of my updates from Twitter, which has the advantage of immediacy, i.e. I can instantly find out what my favorite social media personalities think about a given issue.

I think there will continue to be a place for blogs, although they will get more "niche" as time goes on. There may be more consolidation of the "market" as the smart readers gravitate to the dwindling number of high-quality, frequently updated blogs. I predict blogs will continue to have influence even as most people dumb themselves down on Twitter, Instagram, etc.

Alphonsus Jr. said...

Edward Feser
http://edwardfeser.blogspot.com

&

Ite ad Thomam
http://iteadthomam.blogspot.com/?m=1

Karl said...

Blogs can be divided into the frequent and the seldom. The frequent are the ones you can make a habit of visiting. The seldom are the ones you forget to check because there was nothing new the last few times you looked. The solution is to put all the seldom-updated blogs into your aggregator. (If you don't yet have an aggregator, search for "RSS".) My own feed includes Bugs to Fearen Babes Withal, Boisterous Beholding, The Highway is for Gamblers, and From the Narrow Desert, all by our friend Wm Jas; some of these are seldom updated, and some never, but I just leave it to my aggregator to tell me when there is anything new.


Stephen Cooper said...

Laudator Temporis Acti and Anecdotal Evidence are good.
My explanation why: choose one of your favorite writers and search the archives of either one.
I just ran that experiment, searching for what Anecdotal Evidence had to say about Peguy (who wrote Eve, a very good long poem)
and although only one blog post mentions Peguy (and the blogger did not show that he had actually thought about Peguy - I don't think he has read Tolkien, either, by the way) , the blog post was a short essay very much worth reading ....
or run the experiment with Laudator Temporis Acti, for Tolkien instead of Peguy ...
But I don't read those blogs regularly, only from time to time.

Ian said...

I suppose the answer to the question of which is the best blog could be different from the answer to the question of what is my favorite blog.

But favorite blog would be Throne and Altar or maybe Edward Feser's blog.

Those two blogs and Steve Sailer's are the only ones I read regularly. Formerly, I also read View from the Right and Zippy Catholic regularly.

Chiu ChunLing said...

Probably Sultan Knish (http://sultanknish.blogspot.com). Although Daniel Greenfield posts from within an unambiguously tribalist mindset, the tribe in question is the tribe of Judea, of the House of Israel. My ancestors of that heritage gave up their tribalism ages ago, and helped advance Western Civilization as a result. My ancestors of other heritages did not give up their tribalism so early, and on the balance this wasn't such a good thing. The point is that, while giving up tribalism is better, if you do cling to a tribe, the tribal identity matters. Some are better (or at least less bad) than others.

I could wish that Greenfield posted more often, or that his focus were more eclectic, but I can just read other blogs, and rely on Greenfield to always do relatively well at what it is he is doing. Which is pointing out that Judaism is still essential to the West. It is not (and by nature cannot be) the whole of Western Civilization. But it is not dispensable.

Bruce B. said...

I enjoy Mark Richardson's Oz Conservative.

Ugh said...

Regarding Vox Day... I used to visit his blog regularly and enjoy his visits with other vloggers in the past, he's very good. However, he has a sick obsession with Jordan Peterson. It's one thing to dislike/disagree with another person, but Day is, in my estimation, essentially revealing Peterson as the anti-Christ himself. It's sad and really off putting.

Bruce Charlton said...

@Ugh - With bloggers one must take the rough with the smooth - since regular, frequent, sincere blogging can only be a personal thing, and not a public service.

But I happen to agree with Vox on this issue!

https://charltonteaching.blogspot.com/search?q=Peterson